GWB35 GK-3B install

GWB35 GK-3B install

Hey Willis, Noticed you use the VB-99 System with the GK-3B Midi Pickup on your Bass. Recently bought the GWB35 which is an excellent bass, and perfect for those who want to make the move from fretted to fretless. My question is regarding space when installing the Midi Pickup (thinking of buying the setup for some home recording) as shown in some of your Masterclass Videos. Is it not a bit too close to the Tone Controls? Thanks and Regards, Paul Hey Paul, Before I had the Graphtek Ghost system integrated into the bass, I used the GK-3B. One very common misconception is that the GK-3B is not a MIDI pickup. The VB-99 does have the option for MIDI out but what makes the system almost latency-free is that it processes each string individually and sends the separate signals through 2 parallel effects chains that you can reorder and mix however you want. To cleanly install the GK-3B on the GWB35 without making any permanent modifications to the bass requires that you sacrifice the volume knob. The first install that I did on my GWB1005 was similar but there I sacrificed the tone controls on that one. Since the purpose is to use the V-Bass or VB-99 system, you’ll most likely be using the volume pedal on the floor for volume control so it makes more sense to me now to sacrifice the volume control. By sacrifice, I mean remove the knob and park the volume control (set at full volume) inside the cavity. Feel free to sacrifice whichever control you don’t think you’ll need to access the least. Since...
Flat ?

Flat ?

Hey Willis, I recently got a used a GWB1 and I have noticed the tone is incredibly bright when the on-board controls are set flat. I remember reading that you run yours the same and was wondering what you did to tame the high end, is it all right hand muting? Thanks, Morris Hey Morris, you’ve probably come to realize by now that “flat” is a very relative/subjective term. It really depends on the system you’re running through – whether it’s hi-fi studio monitors or an old 15″ bass cabinet with no tweeters. On the Aguilar 750 I would put the mid and treble controls at about 10 o’clock or less and run the tweeter attenuation all the way off on the GS112’s (this was before the GS112 NT no-tweeter model was available). Now with the 751 it’s closer to “flat”. But when I have to play through other systems I’ll normally roll back the Treble control on the bass. For recording I keep the Bass and Treble controls on my bass flat but I definitely reduce the highs for listening to myself while tracking. What goes to “tape” is the full audio spectrum (according to me). What gets done to it afterwords depends, but it pretty much never involves...
The A.V. Club

The A.V. Club

Hey Willis, I was wondering if you always play what you hear because it’s realiy difficult when you have to play like a fast standard like Moment’s Notice or something. The Chords change so fast it’s difficult to maintain your cool and to play what you hear when it changes all the time. Do you have any tips for me ? stuff you did or solo’s i should transcribe to make melodic lines, to get it into my system so after a while i will start hearing more and faster. Thanks Greetings from Belgium ! Raphael Hey Raphel, Greetings from sunny Spain. I suppose the good news is that playing what I hear is only about half of what happens (for me). The other half is visual (geometric). If I maintain this audio/visual approach without distractions then I can focus on my ideas. I suppose the bad news is that it takes a lot of work to integrate all the elements that make up the visual part: fingerboard geometry, the geometry of harmony – what the neck looks like when chords and keys change – and finally, what the next idea I want to play looks like. Sometimes I really don’t know exactly what I’m about to play will sound like but relying on the geometry keeps the ideas flowing. Sometimes I can hear exactly what I want to play next but my fingers often don’t find it until the last millisecond. The bad news is that to distill all of the work that goes into internalizing all these visual/geometry elements as well as associating your vocabulary and imagination...
Flattery Sandwich

Flattery Sandwich

Hey Willis, Love your sound, man! I just wish I had your chops. Hey, looks like you use D’Addario strings. What type and gauge do you use? Thanks so much, -Dennis- PS: New web site is pretty cool! Normally in the bass-education community, when the semi-generic/quasi-boring question “what gauge strings do you use” comes up, it’s usually the subject of a little derision and a few rolled eyeballs. Normally I find myself struggling to resist pouncing on such a mundane-predictable question, but the sandwiching of such insightful flattery such as “Love your sound, man! I just wish I had your chops.” followed by the “PS: New web site is pretty cool!” lets me know that this particular questioner obviously knows what he’s talking about and must be taken seriously. Or, in other words: flattery will get you everywhere – plus I needed an excuse to reformat the gear page for the new site layout anyway. OK, so Dennis here’s the new page with the pertinent info:...
TuBe or not TuBe?

TuBe or not TuBe?

Hey Willis, I’m looking for a good direct box for recording projects (bass).  I know that you use, or use to use, the Retrospec Juicebox.  Before that I think you were using the Eden Navigator for a while.  Both of them use a tube.  Do feel this is of particular importance for you?  What do you think your tracks would sound like if you used a high quality non-tube DI?  I’m not sure whether or not to go the tube route.BTW heard there’s a new T.T. album in the making.  Awesome! Thanks, Lee Puckett Hey Lee, Yep, we did basic tracking for a new TT CD earlier this month. With our different schedules and the distances, it’ll take a while to finish. We’re expecting to release it before the end of the year. Actually, my last 3 CD’s were tracked with a “high quality non-tube DI” – Slaughterhouse 3, Actual Fiction and Shaman. Starting with Apogee’s Mini-Me, then the Apogee Ensemble and now I’m using the TC Studio Konnekt 48. I’ve always advocated recording with as little processing as possible so that you’re free to go back and manipulate the sound as needed. Once I moved to Europe I didn’t have an accurate way to evaluate the Juicebox going through a voltage converter so I decided to simplify. Now, with plugins, it’s possible to add subtle “warmth” type distortion only as needed but it’s never been central to the sound I’m going...
What About Five?

What About Five?

Hey Willis, I play a Fender four-string fretless jazz bass and like you I love the expressive possibilities and nuances I can obtain. What about the five-string bass? Does the low B string solve a particular problem: e.g. playing in D, or being able to reach down for the fifth while in G? Do you have to mute the B string constantly with your thumb when playing on the upper 4 strings? Thanks, Dean Hey Dean, Yes, Yes and Yes. The move to a 5 was very natural for me because when I played on a 4 I always played as low as possible. I always found myself on the E string when grooving in G or F. It makes the band and sonic spectrum sound bigger. When I first got a 5, the new available register was like an effect, or toy but eventually I tried to seamlessly incorporate it into my playing. There are plenty more benefits – grooves that used to have to be played on the A string – even in C or Bb – sound much bigger and beefier on the E string while still including notes that you would have used with a 4. Dead notes coming from the string below sound much thicker when played off the B string. It took me a few weeks to get a handle on how to keep the B string quiet when playing on the D & G. On a 4, if you never move your thumb off the pickup or E string then your A string will ring when you play in the D &...
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